Obama Signs Law Protecting Corporate Crimes in Space until 2022

Written by Dr Michael Salla on . Posted in Secret Space Programs

Obama signs law protecting corporate crimesOn November 25, President Obama signed into law a bill that provides Federal legal protection for U.S. corporations involved in space mining. Obama’s action is presented as protecting U.S. corporate interests for space mining ventures anticipated to begin around 2025. Yet there is compelling evidence that the true intent is to protect corporations, up to the end of 2022, from prosecution for their ongoing criminal abuses in decades-long secret space mining operations.

Advocates of the U.S. Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act (H.R. 2262 aka the “Space Act of 2015”), believe it enhances the competitiveness of U.S. corporations by cutting away government regulatory power in the birthing of new industries in space such as asteroid mining.

Republican Presidential candidate, Senator Marco Rubio said:

Throughout our entire economy, we need to eliminate unnecessary regulations that cost too much and make it harder for American innovators to create jobs. The reforms included here make it easier for our innovators to return Americans to suborbital space and will help the American space industry continue pushing further into space than ever before. I’m proud the final bill includes proposals I had previously introduced in the Senate, including one related to commercial recovery of space resources.”

The Space Act provides an eight year window for space industries to develop a “safety framework” before federal regulation, if any, becomes applicable as the following section explains:

(8) INDEPENDENT REVIEW.—Not later than December 31, 2022, an independent systems engineering and technical assistance organization or standards development organization contracted by the Secretary [of Transportation] shall submit … an assessment of the readiness of the commercial space industry and the Federal Government to transition to a safety framework that may include regulations. [emphasis added]

The Space Act goes on to describe that the organization contracted by the Secretary of Transportation will evaluate in developing a “safety framework” based on “industry consensus standards” that includes hiring practices:

As part of the review, the contracted organization shall evaluate—

 “(A) the progress of the commercial space industry in adopting voluntary industry consensus standards as reported by the Secretary …

“(B) the progress of the commercial space industry toward meeting the key industry metrics …  including the knowledge and operational experience obtained by the commercial space industry while providing services for compensation or hire;

Basically, space mining corporations have a free pass until 2022 to do what’s necessary to establish “a safety framework” that will govern their industry, including labor standards.

It’s important to emphasize that the language of the Space Act is clearly designed to apply federal regulations, “if any,” after safety standards have been proposed and adopted by the space mining industry in consultation with Congress and the Secretary of Transportation.

This means that all space mining activities up to 2022 are free from any regulatory measures. Perhaps more important is the fact that the Space Act is retroactive in terms of everything regarding space mining activities occurring prior to 2022, with all past activities also exempt from federal regulation and any government oversight.

Contrary to widespread public perception that space mining is something that will occur a decade or so in the future, there is disturbing whistleblower testimony suggesting that there already exists a very profitable and flourishing space industry. It’s existence has been among the most highly classified secrets kept by the U.S military intelligence community.

Corey Goode has caused quite a stir in the alternative media and exopolitics communities with his claims regarding secret space programs abusing workers and being involved in a galactic slave trade. His claims have been examined in a series of articles (see here and here) where significant circumstantial evidence has been cited in support of them.

According to Goode, space mining involving U.S. corporations has been secretly run since the late 1950’s with the ongoing criminal abuse of workers who have been deceived, exploited and/or physically abused. In short, reported slave labor conditions exist in space mining operations going back to the 1950s.

Perhaps even more disturbing is Goode’s claims that these space mining operations were done in collaboration with a breakaway German group associated with the advanced aerospace programs of Nazi Germany. As is well established historical fact, the Nazis pioneered the use of slave labor in advanced technology programs.

cd_s2_ep10_conquering_the_solar_system_cvrIn his latest interview on Cosmic Disclosure, released today, Goode describes how space mining operations progressed beyond secret German bases on Mars, to the asteroid belt, the moons of Jupiter and elsewhere in the solar system.

The raw material gathered in these mining operations were taken back to Mars, and processed into finished products for a high tech manufacturing industry. In the decades since the first German colonies on Mars in the 1940s, Goode claims that U.S. corporations have become integrated into a joint venture with the breakaway German group that is called the Interplanetary Corporate Conglomerate.

The high tech products on Mars are now part of a flourishing trade, which according to a report by Goode, involves up to 900 different extraterrestrial civilizations. The bulk of these products derive from the use of slave labor in manufacturing centers on Mars, or remote mining locations in space.

If Goode’s incredible claims are true, then clearly government regulatory power should be significantly enhanced to prevent corporate crimes in space, especially when U.S. corporations are involved. The Space Act, however, does the precise opposite insofar as it explicitly gives corporations up to 2022 to develop a “safety framework” that includes the use of labor. Why?

While much of the Space Act deals with encouraging corporations to invest in space activities by cutting government regulatory power, there are sections of the bill that appear to go far beyond this.

An earlier article discussed Section 51302 of the Space Act that raised concern about the real intent of the Act. Most attention was given to the following:

(a)In general.—The President, acting through appropriate Federal agencies, shall …

(3) promote the right of United States commercial entities to explore outer space and utilize space resources, in accordance with the existing international obligations of the United States, free from harmful interference…

According to Timothy Nelson, an expert in Space Law, “free from harmful interference,”

… mirrors the United States’ own obligation, in the OST [Outer Space Treaty], to safeguard against activity by its own nationals that “would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States Parties in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies.”

Nelson’s suggests one meaning of the phrase is to ensure other corporate entities or individuals that interfere with space mining activities of a corporation, could be sued in a U.S. Federal Court.

In addition, the phrase “free from harmful interference” also suggests space mining operations would be free of the kind of scrutiny such an industry would normally receive from both domestic government and/or international regulators up until 2022.

The language of the Space Act goes well beyond what its proponents, such as Senator Rubio and others argue, in terms of cutting bureaucratic red tape. It is one thing for a space mining company not to have to comply with complex NASA regulations concerning space launches in order to be competitive with international rivals. It is an entirely different matter for a U.S. corporation not to comply with U.S. labor standards in conducting off-world operations.

While Space Act proponents might be forgiven for dismissing the idea that future U.S. space mining might exploit slave labor, the same cannot be said for a decades-long classified corporate program, which has been accused by Goode and others of doing precisely this.


It’s worth emphasizing that when Goode first came forward in early 2015 with claims that slave labor was being used at bases on Mars, the asteroid belt and elsewhere in the solar system, there did not appear to be much evidence in support of his claims of a decades-long secret corporate space mining operations.

Indeed, space mining seemed to be at least a decade away from becoming a reality as far as the general public was concerned. Yet, legislation has now been quickly passed concerning space mining with little public awareness or debate.

The quick passage of the Space Act suggests that it was designed to give an eight year window (up to 2022), for those involved in corporate crimes in space; to either cover-up past misdeeds to escape prosecution, or to relinquish power in secret negotiations in exchange for legal amnesty.

Here are four reasons why passage of the Space Act can be concluded to be related, at least in part, to Goode’s claims that corporations have been using slave labor in space for decades.

First, at the same time as Goode first made public his incredible claims, the U.S. Congress first began discussing legal protection for a ‘future’ space mining industry. On March 19, 2015, the “Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act of 2015.” was first introduced to Congress.  

The “Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act” was eventually incorporated into the larger bill, “H.R.2262 – U.S. Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act” as Title IV. It was the latter bill that was passed by the House of Representatives on November 17, by the U.S. Senate on November 10, and signed into law by Obama on November 25.

It appears to be an extraordinary coincidence, given Goode’s claims, that legislation would be passed to protect space mining, which is more than a decade away from becoming, a reality, according to conventional public knowledge about corporate activities in space.

Second, the introduction of legislation to protect space mining as a future industry where a “safety framework” would be developed and put in place by 2022, with no government regulations until then, is highly suspicious.

Why was language written into the Space Act protecting corporations from “harmful interference” and the relevance of any labor standards until 2022? The Space Act provides legal protection to corporations that have “voluntarily submitted” to U.S. Federal Court jurisdiction over their space activities, which may have minimal or abusive labor standards, up to 2022.

For example, in the case of a space mining corporation that has imposed slave labor working conditions in past secret operations, the “free from harmful interference” clause suggests that international organizations such as the International Criminal Court would not have the power to directly intervene.

Basically, owners and managers of space mining operations could voluntarily submit to U.S. jurisdiction, and would henceforth be protected under U.S. Federal Law from international organizations investigating them for using slave labor up until 2022.

A third reason is that a number of international legal scholars have pointed out that the Space Act is potentially illegal insofar as it contravenes the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, which explicitly prohibits the commercial exploitation of outer space. Article 1 of the Treaty says:

The exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind.

Clearly, corporations mining space for commercial reasons are not doing so to benefit “all mankind” but acting for their bottom line. If Goode’s claims are true, then it appears that the U.S. Space Act is designed to protect corporations that have been willfully violating international law since at least 1967 in conducting space mining operations for commercial reasons.

The final reason to consider is that on June 11, the British Interplanetary Society began a two day meeting on: “How to Overthrow a Martian Dictatorship” according to a BBC news article. The meeting envisaged a Mars colony ruled over by a ruthless dictator who trampled on the rights of workers in a futurist society controlled by a corporation. The dictator needed to be overthrown without destroying the colony itself. According to the author of the BBC article published on June 22, Richard Hollingham, the meeting brought together 30 prominent scientists, engineers and philosophers who took their “task seriously,” only “two short blocks from the London headquarters of Britain’s security service, MI6” thereby hinting at official support for the meeting.

Coincidently, Goode released a report on June 22 detailing an alleged inspection tour he conducted with another whistleblower of a secret manufacturing colony on Mars. Goode’s report described a tyrannical program manager that exploited workers, and would not tolerate even mild criticisms for visitors.

The similarities in the scenarios discussed at the June 11/12 British Interplanetary Society meeting, and independent June 22 reports by Goode and Hollingham, suggest that key figures in Britain’s scientific establishment  are preparing for future disclosures about secret colonies on Mars and elsewhere that have been run as corporate dictatorships by megalomaniac tyrants that have been abusing workers for years.

How to remove these Mars Colony dictators without them killing off their personnel and/or destroying their valuable facilities is a problem that British and other national policy makers will soon have to confront.

The Space Act provides a means whereby these hypothetical “Mars dictators” could be persuaded to relinquish power. Essentially, the owners and/or managers of manufacturing or mining bases throughout the solar system will be given amnesty if they surrendered control of their facilities before 2022.

While Obama’s signing of the Space Act into law is apparently designed to protect U.S. corporate interests for space mining ventures anticipated to begin around 2025, part of the true intent appears to be to protect corporations from their criminal abuses in decades-long secret space mining operations.

© Michael E. Salla, Ph.D. Copyright Notice

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