Veterans Today: UFO disclosure or disinformation

Veterans Today UFO disclosure

Is Veterans Today a genuine pro-UFO disclosure site where “white hats” in the military intelligence community are leaking what is really happening behind the scenes, or a military psyop disseminating disinformation to divide the truth movement? That is the key question arising from an ongoing debate between the VeteransToday.com and Infowars.com websites where hostile articles and radio shows have been exchanged about the veracity of their respective flag ship icons: Gordon Duff and Alex Jones.

For Veterans Today writers, Infowars is deliberately down-playing Zionist involvement in false flag events because Jones is a shill for Israel’s intelligence service, Mossad. For Infowars, Duff is a self-declared serial misinformer trying to divide the truth movement by inserting falsehoods that are part of a military intelligence psyop.

Investigative Reporter Wayne Madsen recently weighed in on the acrimonious debate by clearly siding with Alex Jones, and accusing Veterans Today of being a military intelligence operation. Madsen’s sterling credentials and NSA background may be enough to settle the issue for those trying to evaluate the Veterans Today and Infowars debate. However, when it comes to the UFO disclosure issue, one that has been given increasing prominence by Veterans Today writers, both Madsen and Jones fall short.

Here is what Madsen had to say about the Veterans Today website on Feb 24:

WMR has received a number of queries about a certain website that claims to cover ‘veterans’ affairs” but actually promotes dubious conspiracies, self-admitted fraudulent stories, and staffers with highly-inflated curricula vitae. In fact, the website contains no information not already available at more reputable websites.

A more trenchant criticism of Veterans Today can be found in a Jan 20, 2014 report on the forum of the Wayne Madsen Report (WMR) website. The unnamed writer provides editorial assistance to Madsen who helped in the fact checking for the report. The WMR writer meticulously outlines the intelligence background of Duff and his editorial board who are involved in a shady intelligence group call Adamus

According to the WMR writer, Adamus is an alleged company located in Zug, Switzerland that presumably has ties with a Swiss organization used by the NSA to monitor official intelligence by national governments as exposed by Madsen in a Feb 1999 report.

The WMR writer cites the Veterans Today website description of the Adamus group.

Several Adamus group companies work in the area we broadly refer to as “disclosure,” managing the integration of “after next-gen” technologies. Among those are energy sectors including a variety of fusion systems, advanced energy weapons and unconventional flight systems. Adamus is privately held, quasi-governmental and operates under the authorities of several treaties and conventions.

The above statement is critical for how easy it is to dismiss Veterans Today and the shady Adamus Group as merely covers for a military psyop as the WMR writer does indeed conclude:

That sounds quite compatible with the NSA-tied Crypto AG with whom they are bunking up in the village in Switzerland.

Another interpretation is that Duff and the Adamus Group  are involved in a pro-disclosure agenda of encouraging the release of classified alien technologies similar to what Col Philip Corso described in the Day After Roswell.

Corso revealed that the U.S. Army was behind a classified attempt to seed alien technologies in the civilian sector, No less than a three star general, Arthur Trudeau, the former head of Army Intelligence, was secretly in charge of the pro-disclosure operation. Is it possible that   that Duff and the Adamus Group is behind a new pro-disclosure initiative that is endorsed by senior military intelligence figures? That indeed is what Duff claims is occurring with the Adamus Group and information released through Veterans Affairs on alien UFO issues.

Unfortunately, Madsen doesn’t give such a possibility the time of day, even though he has shown himself to be sympathetic to the UFO pro-disclosure movement and written favorable comments about the evidence behind it. In a Nov 2007 article titled, “Kucinich is not the only Democrat to have shown an interest in UFOs,” Madsen wrote about documentary evidence that the Clinton administration actively researched the UFO issue.  In a 2009 article, titled “Apollo 14 astronaut says UFOs are real,” he described Edgar Mitchell’s interest in UFOs as something that is helping change mainstream media attention on the subject.

Madsen with many others associated with the UFO disclosure movement associate it as a physical phenomenon that deserves a serious investigation by the US Congress and mainstream media. The focus is firmly on accumulating reliable documentation in terms of photos, radar evidence, pilot reports, Freedom of Information Act records and credible witness accounts of UFOs. Discussion of actual extraterrestrial life is posed merely as a hypothetical explanation of the data, if at all. This kind of UFO disclosure advocacy has since the inception of the UFO era led to a lobbying effort to get Congress and the media to investigate the UFO phenomenon

However, the above approach is only the documented surface level of the UFO cover up. There is much more to the issue in terms of classified programs involving the study of retrieved extraterrestrial technologies; deep underground bases using alien technologies; off-world programs involving a secret space fleet and bases; corporate control over much extraterrestrial information; assassination of prominent US officials opposed to the cover up; face to face meetings with extraterrestrial visitors; and finally secret alien agreements.

This is where Duff and fellow writers such as Preston James go much further in their UFO disclosure advocacy. They embrace the concept of ‘exopolitics’ since they recognize the extraterrestrial issue forms the contextual overlay for understanding geopolitics and international finance. They recognize that the alien issue is the “Holy grail” of international intelligence activities. On that score, Duff and James are correct.

As far as Alex Jones and Infowars.com is concerned, there is little support for the UFO disclosure movement other than isolated articles discussing an alien false flag invasion and an elite belief that extraterrestrials are their progenitors. Yet Jones is on the record in rejecting extraterrestrial conspiracy theories. Like many in the truth movement, UFOs are regarded at best as an unnecessary distraction from real issues if not outright disinformation. On that score, Jones and fellow Infowars writers are deeply in error.

When it comes to UFO disclosure in terms of its deeper exopolitics issues concerning alien life, Gordon Duff, in contrast to Jones and Madsen, is a serious advocate.

Back in 2010, Duff had this to say about UFO disclosure:

The other issue, a very devisive one, UFOs … I have been getting continual feedback out of the DOD on this subject, long the “Holy Grail” of the intel world.  Warnings have been coming out about the United States having UFO technology for decades, capabilities we have kept secret from the public, are in the “chatter world” every day.

Later in Sept 2012 Duff began releasing information from his sources concerning a US Chinese military alliance battling hostile aliens off the coast of California. This was remarkably similar to the scenario described in the movie battleship, and could easily lead to dismissal of Duff’s comments as outright disinformation.

Duff and the other main Veterans Today writer covering the exopolitics issue, Preston James, have gone on to pen articles and give interviews on aggressive aliens battling a consortium of nations secretly working together. James in particular has been prolific in putting out 19 articles that touch on various exopolitics themes many of which promote fearful images of hostile aliens wanting to exploit humanity. His latest exopolitics article is no exception and bears the title, “Alien Agenda XIX: High-tech Soul-snatching and the long planned Final Solution.”

This is where Duff’s declaration that 40% of his information on military intel is disinformation becomes relevant. This is done, according to Duff, to protect sources who are taking major risks in releasing sensitive information on the most classified information in the intel community involving exopolitics. It is one thing for whistleblowers such as Corso to go public after the expiration of their secrecy oaths, decades after the end of the programs they witnessed, it is entirely another thing to spill the beans on current alien projects for personnel still sworn to secrecy. That’s why Duff’s 40% disinformation claim is understandable.

Jones and Madsen, however, don’t buy it. They condemn Duff and co. for disseminating disinformation and doing it so blatently. Clearly, Jones and Madsen don’t want to work in the smoke and mirrors of alien intel or exopolitics where the truth is hidden under layers of disinformation. Yet, Duff is telling us that this is precisely how pro-UFO disclosure advocates in the military-intel community have to work. He has a point, even if it’s a difficult one to accept for those wanting to stick to documented research and data on UFOs, rather than cover more contentious exopolitics issues.

For decades, UFO researchers have tried to focus on the documented phenomenal aspect of the UFO issue, and black-balled researchers probing deeper exopolitics issues where disinformation is rife. The most egregious recent example is the International UFO Congress run by the Open Minds production group that avoids legitimizing exopolitics research by having it covered at its flagship annual event. In its steadfast opposition to exopolitics research, Open Minds reveals itself to be anything but open minded on evidence concerning both historic or current classified extraterrestrial projects. That is unfortunate since it is both possible and necessary to sift through the dross of disinformation to find the nuggets of truth into what is happening in extraterrestrial related programs.

In the now acrimonious debate between Veterans Today and Infowars, the leading protagonists have valid points to make against one another. Jones soft pedaling on Mossad involvement in false flag events is a cause for concern. Duff’s and James’s advocacy of hostile aliens battling multinational alliances lays the foundation for a future alien false flag invasion. This is also a cause for concern,

Wayne Madsen’s weighing in on the acrimonious debate appears to be the impartial assessment of a well credentialed investigative writer. Yet, Madsen is no impartial investigator here. His embrace of UFO disclosure is limited to the documented physical sightings phenomenon, rather than the deeper exopolitics issues at stake.

By introducing exopolitics issues into the public arena, even if mixed with as much as 40% disinformation as Duff and James concede, Veterans Today is opening the door to the public to take a peek into what is really happening behind the scenes. Duff and Veterans Today may be involved in a modern version of Col Corso’s release of classified alien technologies sanctioned by “White Hats” in the military intelligence community. The only way of ultimately telling if Duff’s intel on extraterrestrial projects is a military psyop designed to misinform, or an officially sanctioned UFO disclosure initiative designed to inform, is by doing the necessary exopolitics research.

© Michael E. Salla, Ph.D. Copyright Notice

(Visited 2,858 times, 1 visits today)

Tags: Alex Jones, exopolitics, extraterrestrial life, Gordon Duff, Infowars, UFOs, Veterans Today, Wayne Madsen

ExoPolitics Community Comments (0)

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Facebook Comments ()

G+ Comments (0)