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Scientists release picture of extraterrestrial organisms bombarding Earth

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Scientists from the University of Buckingham have released a picture of an extraterrestrial from deep space that is bombarding the Earth. No, it’s not part of an extraterrestrial invasion. Rather, it is evidence supporting the theory of panspermia, in which microscopic life forms exist in the vacuum of space, and can seed life by arriving in great numbers on habitable planets like the Earth.

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Alien Organism Discovered by University Buckingham scientists

A team of scientists, including Professor Milton Wainwright, from the University of Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology, have conducted scientific tests in the stratosphere. These show that organisms not found on the Earth are arriving from outer space.

Professor Wainwright claims the results prove that life exists outside the Earth. In an interview with Britain’s Express newspaper, he said:

Our team has caused quite a stir over the last couple of two years by claiming these microbes are continually arriving to Earth from space. Our critics have been vocal in dismissing our work but, as yet, no one has provided a viable alternative explanation for our peer reviewed work…. As far as we can tell the particle has no relation to anything found on Earth.

In addition to the microbial life arriving from outer space, Professor Wainwright also revealed that heavy elements were found in the stratosphere. This suggests that these are extraterrestrial arrivals, as well, rather than material being carried up into the stratosphere by winds:

This latest launch is also exciting because the team has found particles containing, so-called, rare earth elements at a height close to 30 kilometres in the stratosphere. These particle masses are too big to have been carried up from Earth and, like the alien life forms we find, must be incoming to Earth from space.

The pictures of extraterrestrial microbes released by Wainwright’s scientific team supports an earlier finding by Russian scientists.

On Aug 19, 2014, ITAR-TASS reported that Russian scientists had found microbial life, similar to sea plankton, on the surface of the International Space Station (ISS). The Russians first detected the microbes over a year earlier and confirmed that these organisms can live in zero gravity within the extremely low temperatures and cosmic radiation. Despite the harsh conditions, the scientists reported that the bacteria were thriving on the surface of ISS and could live there for years.

The Russian discovery is startling since it confirms that extraterrestrial microbes can flourish in deep space. Vladimir Solovyev, chief of the Russian ISS orbital mission said:

Results of the experiment are absolutely unique. We have found traces of sea plankton and microscopic particles on the illuminator surface. This should be studied further.

NASA’s reaction to the startling Russian discovery was silence. This lack of reaction supports the claims of Richard Hoover, a veteran 46 year NASA astrobiologist, who says the civilian U.S. space agency is willfully ignoring clear evidence of extraterrestrial life.

The findings of the University of Buckingham scientists, along with the earlier Russian discovery of a form of sea plankton growing on ISS windows, is powerful evidence that microbial extraterrestrial life is very common throughout our solar system and the galaxy.

The picture of a microscopic space organism arriving on Earth may not be quite what people were expecting for their first glimpse of an extraterrestrial visitor. If these tiny space visitors have been arriving for a very long time – as panspermia advocates suggest – who else might be arriving that is awaiting the right scientific detection tools to discover them? 

© Michael E. Salla, Ph.D. Copyright Notice

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Tags: extraterrestrial life, International Space Station, NASA, Panspermia, Richard Hoover, University of Buckingham

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